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Software As If It Matters

David Dossot

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Top Stories by David Dossot

To be able to do anything useful, an ESB must be configured with all sorts of parameters, from endpoint connection URIs to message transformation scripts to content-based routing definitions. Moreover, ESBs like Mule can host custom components, which will process messages and perform user-specific actions on them. Deploying a new version of an ESB configuration raises the question of whether it will break anything. How can we build confidence that everything will be just fine? If unit testing did it for standard software development, what can it do in the realm of the ESB? Since ESBs are becoming increasingly familiar in corporate IT, getting concrete answers is of interest to more and more people. This article details the testing strategies I employ for Mule ESB-driven projects, which I think contain elements that could be generalized to other platforms. I am cer... (more)

Software Manifestos: A Matter Of Trust?

As software manifestos have started to proliferate these past months, I have started to wonder what could be the root cause for their creation. Why would thought leaders gather, assert a small set of values and shrink-wrap them as a manifesto, calling for others to sign it? My feeling is that these manifestos are the expression of a pushback on a particular aspect of software development that went insane. Here is a little game: match the manifestos with the software insanities they push back on: Big methodology and design up-front Software craftsmanship manifestoArmy of flying monk... (more)

Grafting Mule Endpoints

In Mule ESB, outbound dispatching to a destination whose address is known at runtime only is a pretty trivial endeavor. A less frequent practice consists in programmatically defining inbound service endpoints. I recently had to do such thing for a little side project I'm running where Mule is used as a frontal bus and load throttler in front of a R nodes exposed over RMI. The goal was to have a non-fixed number of file inbound endpoints defined in a simple properties file and declare them on a particular service during the initialization sequence of Mule. As an integration framewo... (more)

DevOps Days Vancouver 2014 By @DDossot | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Call Me Never (Ignite Talk) I've been super honored to give an ignite talk during DevOps Days Vancouver 2014. Ignite talks are intense, as the slides mercilessly fly-by every 15 seconds, and this for 5 minutes sharp (yes, that's just 20 slides!). In this talk, I tried to present some of the lessons we've learned at Unbounce while rebuilding our page serving infrastructure. Our availability target is five-nines (that's an allowance of 6 seconds of downtime per week) so we've put lots of effort into building a stable, self-healing, gracefully-degrading piece of software. We had a f... (more)

The Holy Grail of Persistence?

One of the very first CTO-grade decision I had to take in the making of Snoget was to pick what would become our main transactional persistence engine. Since we're using Erlang exclusively for our production servers, the solution seemed easy: use Mnesia. But I settled for PostgreSQL. At this point, anyone who's been dealing with O/R mapping (like Ted Neward who said: "Object/relational mapping is the Vietnam of Computer Science"), should cry fool: Mnesia would offer me persistence without any impedence mismatch with the application runtime environment and I preferred a SQL databa... (more)